Powder Post Beetle
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Powder Post Beetles 

Anobiid Powder-Post Beetle

The anobiid powder-post beetle is 1/16 to 1/4 inch long, reddish brown or grayish brown to dark brown. Its body is cylindrical, elongated and covered with fine hair. Its head is covered by pronotum from top view; the last 3 segments of antennae are usually lengthened and broadened. The larva are white, "C" shaped with rows of small spines on dorsal side. This beetle's life cycle is 1 to 10 years. Anobiids infest seasoned softwood and the sapwood of seasoned hardwoods.

Figure 1. Deathwatch Beetle (Anobiidae).

 

Signs of Infestation

Emergence holes from anobiids are 1/16 to 1/8 inch in diameter, round in shape. Cigar-shaped frass found loosely in tunnels and in small mounds outside of emergence holes.

Management

If infestation is localized, treat wood with a residual spray; if well advanced, fumigate the structure.

Non-chemical management may be obtained by sanding, filling cracks then painting, varnishing or waxing. Replace wood if damage is extensive.

Bostrichid powder-post beetles are 1/8 to 3/4 inch long, reddish brown to black in color. Their bodies areelongated and cylindrical with roughened thorax. Heads are deflexed and concealed by pronotum from top view; antennae are short with 3 or 4 enlarged sawtoothed terminal segments. The larva is white, "C" shaped with no spines on body. The life cycle is 1 year. Bostrichids infest seasoned softwood and hardwood; especially unfinished floors, window sills, furniture, etc.

Figure 2. Bamboo Borer (Bostrichidae).

Signs of Infestation

The round emergence hole is 1/8 to 3/16 inch in diameter. Sawdust-like frass sticks together and is found tightly packed in galleries but not in entrance holes.

Management

If infestation is localized, treat wood with a residual spray; if well advanced, fumigate the structure. Replace wood if damage is extensive.

Non-chemical management may be obtained by sanding, filling cracks, then painting, varnishing or waxing. Replace wood if damage is extensive.

Lyctid Powder-Post Beetle

Lyctid powder-post beetles are about 1/4 inch long, brown in color, body elongated and slightly flattened, prominent head not covered by pronotum, antennae with a 2-segmented terminal club. The larvae are white, "C" shaped, with 8th abdominal spiracle enlarged. This beetle's life cycle is 6 months to 4 years. Lyctids infest the sapwoods of hardwoods; mainly ash, hickory, oak, maple and mahogany.

Figure 3. Powder-Post Beetle (Lyctid).

Signs of Infestation

The round emergence hole is 1/16 to 1/8 inch in diameter. A fine powder-like dust is found loosely packed in tunnels and in small piles outside of the hole.

Management

If infestation is localized, treat wood with a residual spray; if well advanced, fumigate the structure.

Non-chemical management may be obtained by sanding, filling cracks, then painting, varnishing or waxing. Replace wood if damage is extensive.

Old House Borer

The larvae of a long-horned beetle (old house borer) sometimes infests seasoned softwoods in Florida. The eggs are laid in crevices of the bark of cut logs and the larvae require 3 to 5 years or more to mature. The larvae are white, segmented and have an enlarged, brownish head. They bore through the sapwood making irregular galleries. During quiet times, their feeding may be heard as a clicking or rasping sound. The beetles emerge through an oval hole about 1/4 inch in diameter. The adult beetle is grayish-black, 1/2 to 3/4 inch in length with several white markings on the wing covers and long antennae. Re-infestation in buildings is not common.

Figure 4. Old House Borer (Cerambycidae).

Management

Localized infestations can usually be managed as outlined for powder-post beetles. Management is very difficult in large timbers, because it is almost impossible to get an insecticide deep enough into the wood. If the infestation is not confined to small areas, fumigation of the entire structure may be necessary by a licensed pest control operator.

 

                                                    

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Last modified: April 14, 2004